<address id="bcae" ></address>
  • <option id="bcae" ></option>

    1. <samp id="bcae" ></samp>

    2. <p id="bcae" ></p>
      1. <listing id="bcae" ></listing><li id="bcae" ><tt id="bcae" ></tt></li>
        It's Been a Minute with Sam Sandersv社 Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.v社
        IBAM
        NPR

        v社

        Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

        v社

        v社

        Guest host Elise Hu looks at how the pandemic has exacerbated existing problems when it comes to the care of small children. A Massachusetts childcare center owner shares her story about reopening, while a public policy professor talks about the difficult choices women often have to make between their careers and caregiving. Also, a look at how mukbang and true crime collide in the world of Stephanie Soo, a YouTube star and host of the Rotten Mango podcast.

        Bill Nye presents science for adults in Bill Nye Saves the World on Netflix. Eddy Chen/Netflix v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        Eddy Chen/Netflix

        v社

        v社

        Sam revisits his 2017 chat with Bill Nye the Science Guy. They discuss climate change (and climate change deniers), how Nye got his start in TV, and whether fame has changed him, for better or worse.

        v社

        • v社Downloadv社
        • <v社iframe src="http://clubsondy.com/player/embed/907890608/907925969" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player"> v社

        KQED podcast Truth Be Told is hosted by Tonya Mosley. KQED v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        KQED

        v社

        v社

        A special bonus feed drop from the KQED podcast Truth Be Told, hosted by v社Tonya Mosley. A conversation about parenting during the pandemic — there's no right way to do it. Tonya and two Wise Ones, Nancy Redd, author and mother, and Wajahat Ali, New York Times contributor and father, answer questions about parenting during this tricky time.

        v社

        • v社Downloadv社
        • <v社iframe src="http://clubsondy.com/player/embed/906855322/907317676" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player"> v社

        This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Chicano Moratorium against the Vietnam War and the march and rally in Los Angeles on August 29, 1970, that ended in around 200 hundred arrests, many injuries and 3 deaths. David Fenton/Getty Images v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        David Fenton/Getty Images

        v社

        v社

        This week we're talking protests, both old and new. On Wednesday, Milwaukee Bucks players refused to play their NBA playoff game in protest of racial injustice. Other pro athletes in the NBA, WNBA and more also walked off the job. Sam talks it out with Clinton Yates, columnist for The Undefeated. Then, we take it back 50 years to the Chicano Moratorium in Los Angeles on August 29, 1970. That march and rally against the Vietnam War ended in 200 arrests, many injuries, and three deaths, including journalist Rubén Salazar. It's Been a Minute producer Andrea Gutierrez shares a personal story about it.

        Billy Porter currently stars in FX's Pose as Pray Tell, a ballroom emcee turned AIDS activist in 1980s and early 90s New York. Shavonne Wong v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        Shavonne Wong

        v社

        v社

        Billy Porter is a force to be reckoned with. A Tony Award-winning Broadway performer. A fashion icon with unforgettable red carpet looks. An Emmy Award-winning actor (with another nomination under his belt this year). Currently, Porter stars in the acclaimed FX show Pose, all about New York's underground ball culture in the 80s and 90s. It's also takes place during the height of the HIV-AIDS crisis.

        Workers wear personal protective equipment as they check ballots beside security cages at a Board of Elections facility, Wednesday, July 22, 2020, in New York. John Minchillo/AP v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        John Minchillo/AP

        v社

        v社

        Everyone's talking about obstacles to voting this year, from the post office to the pandemic. Sam talks with NPR's v社Miles Parks about how everything's supposed to work with the election in November. Then, Sam calls up historian Martha S. Jones, author of the forthcoming book Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All. They talk about why voting looks the way it does even in a normal cycle, and what the U.S. Constitution actually says about voting. Plus, Sam talks with comedian Robin Thede, creator and showrunner of A Black Lady Sketch Show, which is nominated for three Emmys this year. They talk about her long career in comedy, which includes her time as head writer for The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore and as host of The Rundown with Robin Thede, and play the game Who Said That.

        Supporters cheer as President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Wittman Airport, Monday, Aug. 17, 2020, in Oshkosh, Wis. Evan Vucci/AP v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        Evan Vucci/AP

        v社

        v社

        We're in the homestretch of the 2020 presidential election campaign. Joe Biden announced Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate, Democrats have their national convention this week, Republicans next week, and each party's candidate is hoping to energize their voter base. Sam talks to The Atlantic's McKay Coppins about Donald Trump's base and how his campaign's digital efforts have evolved since 2016. Then NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid turns the focus to Biden's eclectic coalition of voters — who include not only a growing number of Black and brown voters, but also white, college-educated suburban voters — and who have one goal in common: to defeat Trump in November.

        Joyce Lilly moves a filing cabinet as her dog Max follows, Tuesday, July 21, 2020, in the Riverdale neighborhood of The Bronx, in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        Mark Lennihan/AP

        v社

        v社

        Home sales are up, but the number of people facing evictions is also up. Sam talks to The Indicator's v社Stacey Vanek Smith and Cardiff Garcia about the good and bad news of the housing market in a pandemic. Then, TikTok is massively popular around the world, but now it's under fire from the Trump Administration due to national security concerns. We hear from NPR tech reporter Bobby Allyn about the latest on the social media upstart and what a proposed ban has to do with China and user data.

        Co-hosts Peter Kafka and Rani Molla dive deep into the streaming service in the podcast Land of the Giants. Vox Media v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        Vox Media

        v社

        v社

        One of the few companies doing well during this pandemic is Netflix. In the last few months, the streaming service has seen a huge uptick in new subscribers. Sam talks to Peter Kafka and Rani Molla, co-hosts of the podcast Land of the Giants, about the Netflix effect — how it got to where it is today, its win over Blockbuster, and the one TV show that launched a thousand binges (figuratively speaking).

        Regina King attends the Premiere Of HBO's Watchmen at The Cinerama Dome. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images v社 v社hide captionv社v社

        v社toggle captionv社v社
        Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

        v社

        v社

        Sam revisits his chat with Regina King from 2019 after the actress' recent Emmy nomination for her performance on the HBO series Watchmen. In this encore interview, King talks about why she gravitates toward work that deals with race and policing, why she's still proud to call herself an American and why that also means demanding things to get a lot better than they are now.

        v社

        • v社Downloadv社
        • <v社iframe src="http://clubsondy.com/player/embed/896997452/897924446" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player"> v社
        Back To Top
        or search npr.org